Event Details

Boston’s own beloved and celebrated Annette Miller presents Now Is Our Time: The Pleasures and Perils of our Third Chapter. A new theater piece, Annette created it while a Resident Scholar at Brandeis University’s Women’s Studies Research Center.  By turns poignant, joyous, and resolute, this theatrical collage explores the mix of experiences and reflections of “women of a certain age.”

Annette Miller’s theater credits are legion: She created the role of Golda Meir in the pre-Broadway production of Golda’s Balcony, and has given life to the roles of Maria Callas in Master Class, Martha Mitchell in Martha Mitchell Calling, and Vi in August Osage County. The winner of numerous awards for her performances, Annette’s capacity to have an audience empathize with the challenges faced by women and men in their “third chapter” reaches new heights with her composition of this original work.

The Sarajevo Haggadah

How did a book written in Hebrew, covered in gold and silver leaf, illustrated with pigments made from lapis lazuli, azurite, and malachite, and believed to originate in 14th century Spain, wind up in Sarajevo? This is just one of many mysteries of the Sarajevo Haggadah, a work whose very existence challenged scholars to reevaluate their belief that Jews forbid illustrations in sacred texts.

Sarajevo-Image-v3It’s estimated that the codex was created in the mid-14th century during the convivencia period in Spain, when Jews, Muslims, and Christians all coexisted. From there, the Haggadah somehow found its way to Venice, likely following Ferdinand and Isabella’s expulsion of all Spanish Jews. Although Jews still had to wear an identifying cap and could only live in Venice’s ghetto, they still had rights to property and legal protection— rights hard to find elsewhere in Europe. Yet it’s puzzling to conceive how the Catholic Priest Giovanni Domenico Vistorini saw fit to inscribe “revisto per mi”—surveyed by me, words of approval—underneath the final lines of Hebrew text.  While most books written in Hebrew were destroyed by the Inquisition, amazingly, this remarkable Haggadah survived.

From Venice, the Haggadah’s whereabouts are unknown until 1894. At that time, a Jewish family named Kohen sold it to the Museum in Sarajevo. Sent to Vienna (the Austro-Hungarian Empire’s capital) for assessment and preservation, it was immediately recognized as a great work of art. Unfortunately, its greatness was somewhat diminished by the work of an incompetent conservator, who ruined the rebinding and accidentally cropped the parchments—discarding whatever ornate bindings it once had.

Back in Sarajevo, the Haggadah’s modern-day tale of survival continued as it was twice saved by Muslims. First, during World War II, the Bosnian National Museum’s chief librarian and Islamic scholar, Dervis Korkut, risked his life to ensure the book’s safety in 1942. When Korkut got word that General Johann Fortner, a Nazi commander, was visiting the museum’s director—presumably to take the famous Haggadah—he and the director quickly took action. After stuffing the codex underneath his shirt and tucking it into his belt, Korkut acted as translator for the General and museum director. When Fortner asked for the Haggadah, the director pretended to be confused telling the commander that one of his officers had already been to the museum and asked for it, which he had of course handed over immediately. When the angered commander asked for the officer’s name, the swift reply was brilliant: “Sir, I did not think it was my place to require a name.”

The Haggadah spent the remaining war years in a mountain village, where Korkut’s friend was the Imam of a small mosque. After the war, it returned to the museum. But in 1992, the building got caught in the damage of the Serb forces (they later burned the city’s library to the ground). Once again, the museum’s Muslim librarian, Enver Imamovic, secretly stowed the book away in a bank vault for safe keeping during the war.

Geraldine Brooks brings this rich, fascinating, and mysterious history to life in her fictionalized account of the Sarajevo Haggadah, The People of the Book which was a New York Times bestseller. Through the book, Merima Ključo has found musical inspiration to interpret the  Haggadah’s incredible story.

About Geraldine Brooks, author of The People of the Book

Australian-born writer Geraldine Brooks’ journalism background laid the foundation for her novel The People of the Book. After she finished Columbia University’s journalism master’s program, she set about covering crises in the Middle East, Africa, and the Balkans for the Wall Street Journal. While reporting from Sarajevo she heard about the 14th century Haggadah and was intrigued. But, given the circumstances, she only thought to follow up and learn more years later. After writing her 2006 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel March (told from the perspective of the father from Little Women, as he serves as a chaplain in the Civil War), Brooks spent that same year as a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies at Harvard University. During this time, she researched much the material for the various stories within People of the Book (such as scientific background and understanding for the fictitious clues in the Haggadah).

Brooks’ novel Caleb’s Crossing was a New York Times best seller. Her other novels, including Year of Wonders and People of the Book, are international bestsellers, and have been translated into more than 25 languages. She currently lives with her family on Martha’s Vineyard.

About Merima Ključo, composer and performer, The Sarajevo Haggadah: Music of the Book 

Born in Bosnia and currently based in Los Angeles, concert accordionist Merima Ključo performs internationally both as a soloist and with symphonies. In addition, she composes and arranges for concerts, theater, opera, and film. Ključo seeks to share her love of music, particularly the music of Bosnia, with audiences around the world. Long fascinated by the wondrous and complex history of the Sarajevo haggadah, Ključo was inspired to create what would become the musical and visual The Sarajevo Haggadah: Music of the Book when she realized that it reflected her own life and “exodus.”  Ključo notes, “I was forced to leave my own country under the strangest and heaviest circumstances and find a new country.” In her new work receiving its debut tour this spring, the Sarajevo Haggadah also seeks a new home in new countries over the centuries.

Moo Shu Jew Show 2015

December 24, 2015

Hei La Moon 88 Beach St, Boston, MA 02111, USA

@ 6:00 PM – $80 Adults / $45 Young Adults (Under 40)

Back for a fifth year by popular demand, this Meshugganah show was created for Jews to enjoy on Christmas Eve – where else, but in a Chinese restaurant? Join us for an evening of Jewish inspired stand-up comedy along with dinner (no shellfish, no pork!).

Menu:
Appetizers: Teriyaki Beef – Vegetable Spring Rolls – Scallion Pancakes – Vegetable Hot and Sour Soup
Main Dishes: Orange Beef – Kung Pau Chicken – Tofu with Mixed Vegetables – Vegetable Lo Mein
Drinks: Diet Coke served on table – Cash Bar available

Moo-Shu-Comics

Event Details

New Center LIVE! Lexington: Call of Duty with Joe Klein

Joe-Klein

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November 16, 2015

In his new book, Charlie Mike, celebrated journalist and author Joe Klein illuminates a little known side of the aftermath of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, a story of compassion, resilience, and service. Wounded in Iraq, Eric Greitens, a Jewish Navy SEAL and Rhodes Scholar, returns home and discovers a new band of comrades—veterans determined to continue serving their communities, their country, and the world, despite their injuries. Greitens creates The Mission Continues, an organization that supports and inspires wounded soldiers to do public service work. Klein talks about Greitens’ story, as well as that of one of The Mission Continues first fellows, Marine sergeant Jake Wood, and the courageous ways that wounded veterans are redefining service. Joe Klein is the bestselling author of Primary Colors and a columnist for Time magazine.

Temple-Logos

Event Details

Arsenal Center for the Arts 321 Arsenal Street, Watertown, MA 02472, USA

$45 / $28 @ 7:30 PM

This concert celebrates Israel’s 67th Independence Day in song. Some joyful, some poignant, some iconic, and some not as well known, these songs reflect the complexity of Israel’s soul.  Featuring young talented Israeli musicians studying in Boston, the concert is organized and narrated by Matti Kovler, a highly accomplished composer-performer. Matti’s work has been commissioned by Tanglewood and Carnegie Hall.  In 2013 he was recognized by the Boston Foundation with the Brother Thomas Fellowship.  Like his other collaborations with the New Center, this concert grows out of Matti’s commitment to establishing the bridges connecting Israeli artists studying in the U.S. to the local Jewish community.

New Center OnStage: Jewish Playwriting Contest

After stops in New York, Chicago, and San Francisco, the 4th annual Jewish Playwriting Contest is coming to Boston for the first time this Spring. An international search for the best unpublished Jewish plays, the Contest has vetted 712 plays from 610 writers in 28 states and 9 countries since 2012, and is proud to present this year’s Top 3 for your enjoyment – and judgement. Come watch a cast of stellar actors read 20-minute sections from 3 plays, hear Jewish Plays Project Founder David Winitsky share the latest trends, and then use your cell phone to vote on which play should continue on in the Contest. The ultimate winner gets a workshop production for industry leaders in New York as part of JPP’s OPEN: Festival of New Jewish Theater at the 14th Street Y this June.

New Center NOW: Beyond Bubbie’s Kitchen

Duck confit latke, anyone? Beyond Bubbie’s Kitchen is Boston’s premier Jewish food celebration, exploring the Jewish culinary imagination of the area’s best chefs.

Back for the 6th year, join hundreds at the Back Bay Events Center and enjoy inspired modern updates on traditional Jewish favorites (check out some of these delicious dishes).

Sample beer, wine, cider, and rum, stop by the Kitchen Conversations booth to share your favorite food story, and taste the creative twists on Jewish fare from some of Boston’s top chefs and vendors.

2015 Chefs and Restaurants Include:

Tony Maws of Craigie on Main

Michael Leviton of Lumière

Josh Ziskin of La Morra

Jim Solomon of The Fireplace

Josh Brooks of Catalyst

Mei Li of
Mei Mei Street Kitchen

Dave Punch of Sycamore

Avi Shemtov of
The Chubby Chickpea

Alex Khitrik of Inna’s Kitchen

Steven Peljovich of
Michael’s Deli

Chris Hallahan ofKitchensurfing

Ganei Beantown

Kitchen Kibitz

Robin Cohen of Doves & Figs

State Park

Neely Cohen of Vicuña Chocolate

Bantam Cider

Gubba Rum

Notch Brewing

James DiSabitino of Roxy’s Grill Cheese

 

New Center OnSTAGE: The Moo Shu Jew Show

@ 6 PM – SOLD OUT! SOLD OUT! SOLD OUT!

SOLD OUT! NO TICKETS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR TONIGHT!

Back for a fourth year by popular demand, this Meshugganah show was created for Jews to enjoy on Christmas Eve — where else, but in a Chinese Restaurant?  Join us for an evening of Jewish inspired stand-up comedy along with dinner (no shellfish, no pork!). PARKING INFORMATION: Chinatown Garage – CLICK HERE for more info! ADDRESS: 125 Lincoln St, Boston, MA 02111 Entrance: 86 Beach St, Boston, MA 02111 Enter after 5 PM for $12 Parking. CLICK HERE for a Google Map of other parking lots in the area.  Moo-Shu-MenuComedians

Exploring the Jewish Imagination through Arts and Culture

he New Center for Arts and Culture celebrates the rich diversity of the Jewish imagination. The only Boston organization of its kind, the New Center explores universal themes through a Jewish lens, presenting world-class thinkers and artists through riveting conversations and performances. Aiming to strengthen the Jewish community and share the vitality of Jewish culture with a broad audience in Boston and beyond, the New Center delves into Jewish thought and culture through three strands of programming:

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New Center LIVE!

Our signature series explores the Jewish imagination through provocative conversation. Featuring the most acclaimed and original Jewish writers, artists, musicians, political figures and humorists  New Center LIVE! offers lively, revealing conversations about their lives and work and also  invites authentic give-and-take with  audience members. New Yorker cartoon editor Robert Mankoff, New York Times architecture critic Paul Goldberger, and CNN commentator Bill Schneider in conversation with political statistician Nate Silver and composer Osvaldo Golijov are among the thought leaders sharing their  takes on culture high and low.

New Center OnStage

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Reflecting the insight, passion, humanity and humor of Jewish culture, New Center OnStage explores the Jewish imagination through inspiring performance. Innovative theatrical, musical, dance and artistic presentations take center stage to unveil a variety of talents: Hershey Felder, channelling Maestro: Leonard Bernstein in the one-man musical play, and A Fine Romance, a medley of classic American songs penned by Jewish songwriters, are among the events taking the spotlight.

New Center NOW

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Engaging culturally-curious young adults through spirited and educational activities, New Center NOW explores the Jewish imagination through interaction. The lively mix of events features cooking, art, dance, film, music and assorted pop culture happenings– all with a Jewish twist. Programming runs the gamut from Beyond Bubbie’s Kitchen, an annual food tasting with Boston’s favorite chefs adding new zest to traditional Jewish recipes, to the adventures of fabricating glass dreidles and partaking in Jewishly-inspired yoga. All New Center NOW programs are conceived and planned by our young adult leadership.

God Walks Into a Bar

Date:

Monday February 6, 2012
7:00 PM

Venue:

Church
69 Kilmarnock Street Boston, MA 02215

Admission:

$10 in Advance / $15 at the Door

For more information call:

617-531-4610

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